Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

Nursing Best Practice Guidelines

Interprofessional Competency Framework Self-Assessment Tool

[Adapted from the CIHC National Competency Framework (2010) and the RNAO conceptual model for developing and sustaining interprofessional health care (2013)]
This abbreviated self-assessment survey allows you to reflect on your areas of strength in collaborative practice and areas you may wish to strengthen. Please indicate how well you believe you perform each of the following indicators.

1. Care expertise
Interprofessional care requires collaboration between health-care professionals and patients and their families and circles of care in order to identify and take advantage of each person’s care expertise. To support interprofessional practice, learners/practitioners are able to:

2. Shared power
Willingness to share power is a commitment to create balanced relationships through democratic practices of leadership, decision making, authority and responsibility. To support interprofessional practice, learners/practitioners are able to:

3. Collaborative leadership
Collaborative leadership (also called reciprocal or shared leadership) is a people- and relationship-focused approach based on the premise that answers should be found in the collective (the team). To support interprofessional practice, learners/practitioners collaboratively determine who will provide group leadership in any given situation by supporting:

4. Optimizing profession, role and scope
Exemplary interprofessional care lets all team members work to their full scope of practice and takes advantage of the synergies professionals working together can create. To support interprofessional practice, learners/practitioners are able to:

5. Shared decision-making
Shared decision-making gives all team members, including patients, the opportunity to contribute their knowledge and expertise, to arrive collaboratively at an optimal goal. To support interprofessional practice, learners/practitioners are able to:

6. Effective group function
A health-care system that supports effective teamwork can improve the quality of patient care, enhance patient safety, and reduce workload issues that cause burnout among professionals. To support interprofessional practice, learners/practitioners are able to:

7. Competent Communication
Competent communication—openness, honesty, respect for each other’s opinions and effective communication skills—is part of all domains of interprofessional practice. To support interprofessional practice, learners/practitioners are able to:

Review and reflect on the score you have given yourself. The scores reflecting “rarely” and “never” in any particular domain may be areas you wish to develop further. Having completed your self assessment, it is recommended that you discuss your results with your mentor or a trusted colleague in your team.
The full version of this assessment tool is available in the guideline www.rnao.ca/bpg/interprofessional